Flag of England

Art Print

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      $24.9

      This numbered edition Giclée Art Print, designed by Bruce Stanfield, comes with a numbered and signed certificate of authenticity. Printed on 100% cotton, acid-free, heavyweight paper using HDR UltraChrome Archival Ink, this artwork reflects our commitment to the highest color, paper, and printing standards.

      This numbered edition Fine Art Block designed by Bruce Stanfield is numbered, signed and comes with a certificate of authenticity. Artwork is printed on fine art paper using archival inks and mounted to a 2" deep hand stained dark brown frame. Comes ready to hang.

      • Numbered and signed certificate
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      • 100 days free return policy
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      Also available as

      • Canvas Print Canvas Print
        $59
      • Aluminum Print Aluminum Print
        $74.9
      • Acrylic Glass Print Acrylic Glass Print
        $85
      • Disk Disk
        $84

      About this Artwork

      The flag of England is derived from St. George's Cross (heraldic blazon: Argent, a cross gules). The association of the red cross as an emblem of England can be traced back to the Middle Ages, and it was used as a component in the design of the Union Flag in 1606; however, the English flag has no official status within the United Kingdom. Since the 1990s it has been in increasingly wide use, particularly at national sporting events. In 1188 Henry II of England and Philip II of France agreed to go on a a crusade, and that Henry would use a white cross and Philip a red cross. 13th-century authorities are unanimous on the point that the English king adopted the white cross, and the French king the red one (and not vice versa as suggested by later use). It is not clear at what point the English exchanged the white cross for the red-on-white one. There was a historiographical tradition claiming that Richard the Lionheart himself adopted both the flag and the patron saint from Genoa at some point during his crusade. This idea can be traced to the Victorian era, Perrin (1922) refers to it as a "common belief", and it is still popularly repeated today, even though it cannot be substantiated as historical.

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      Bruce Stanfield

      Sudbury, Canada

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      • " The print was exactly like the image that I saw online, and it arrived very quickly and in great condition. "Sarah
      • " The print quality is really beautiful. The material is gorgeous and well done. The colors are stunning too. It's worth it! "Monica Mendes
      • " I got a print by Jason Ratliff from his series with superheros and kids. It’s in my office and I get compliments on it all the time. "Jason
      • " Very good quality, well finished, nice color, very bright... A real pleasure to see it every day in my apartment! "Camille