Manneken Pis. Celebrity.

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      This numbered edition Giclée Art Print, designed by Andy Za, comes with a numbered and signed certificate of authenticity. Printed on 100% cotton, acid-free, heavyweight paper using HDR UltraChrome Archival Ink, this artwork reflects our commitment to the highest color, paper, and printing standards.

      This numbered edition Fine Art Block designed by Andy Za is numbered, signed and comes with a certificate of authenticity. Artwork is printed on fine art paper using archival inks and mounted to a 2" deep hand stained dark brown frame. Comes ready to hang.

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      About this Artwork

      Manneken Pis, meaning "Little man Pee" in Dutch is a landmark small bronze sculpture (61 cm) in Brussels, depicting a naked little boy urinating into a fountain's basin. It was designed by Hiëronymus Duquesnoy the Elder (nl) and put in place in 1618 or 1619. Manneken Pis is the best-known symbol of the people of Brussels. It also embodies their sense of humour and their independence of mind. The 61-centimetre (24 in) tall bronze statue on the corner of Rue de l'Etuve and Rue des Grands Carmes was made, in 1619, by Brussels sculptor Hieronimus Duquesnoy the Elder, father of the more famous François Duquesnoy. The figure has been repeatedly stolen: the current statue dates from 1965. The original restored version is kept at the Maison du Roi/Broodhuis on the Grand Place. There are several legends behind this statue, but the most famous is the one about Duke Godfrey III of Leuven. In 1142, the troops of this two-year-old lord were battling against the troops of the Berthouts, the lords of Grimbergen, in Ransbeke (now Neder-Over-Heembeek). The troops put the infant lord in a basket and hung the basket in a tree to encourage them. From there, the boy urinated on the troops of the Berthouts, who eventually lost the battle. Another legend states that in the 14th century, Brussels was under siege by a foreign power. The city had held its ground for some time, so the attackers conceived of a plan to place explosive charges at the city walls. A little boy named Julianskehappened to be spying on them as they were preparing. He urinated on the burning fuse and thus saved the city. There was at the time (middle of the 15th century, perhaps as early as 1388) a similar statue made of stone. The statue was stolen several times. Another story, often told to tourists, tells of a wealthy merchant who, during a visit to the city with his family, had his beloved young son go missing. The merchant hastily formed a search party, which scoured all corners of the city, until the boy was found happily urinating in a small garden. The merchant, as a gift of gratitude to the locals who helped out during the search, had the fountain built. Another legend tells that a small boy went missing from his mother when shopping in the centre of the city. The woman, panic-stricken by the loss of her child, called upon everyone she came across, including the mayor of the city. A citywide search began, and when at last the child was found, he was urinating on the corner of a small street. The story was passed down over time and the statue erected as a tribute to the well-known legend. Another legend tells of the young boy who was awoken by a fire and was able to put out the fire with his urine. In the end this helped stop the king's castle from burning down. The statue has been stolen seven times; the last time in January 1963, by students of the Antwerp student association "De Wikings" of the Sint-Ignatius Handelshogeschool (Higher Business Education), now part of the Antwerp University, who "hijacked" Manneken Pis for five days before handing it over to the Antwerp authorities. The local and international press covered the story, contributing to the students' collection of funds donated to two orphanages.

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      Andy Za

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      • " This print was perfect and at the right price point. "Maegan Bragg
      • " Picture came rolled up and secure. Images were vibrant and original. Loved the designs and quality. "Michelle
      • " Wonderful and high quality! "L.E.
      • " I was looking for a classy, sexy, modern print to hang on an exposed brick wall-this was perfect. Everyone comments on how great it looks! "Mel